Risk Factors for Reoperation in Patients Treated Surgically for Lumbar Stenosis: A Subanalysis of the 8-year Data From the SPORT Trial - Spinal DISC Center | Kris Radcliff, MD | New Jersey
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Risk Factors for Reoperation in Patients Treated Surgically for Lumbar Stenosis: A Subanalysis of the 8-year Data From the SPORT Trial

Michael C Gerling, Dante Leven, Peter G Passias, Virginie Lafage, Kristina Bianco, Alexandra Lee, Jon D Lurie, Tor D Tosteson, Wenyan Zhao, Kevin F Spratt, Kristen Radcliff, Thomas J Errico: Risk Factors for Reoperation in Patients Treated Surgically for Lumbar Stenosis: A Subanalysis of the 8-year Data From the SPORT Trial. In: Spine (Phila Pa 1976), vol. 41, no. 10, pp. 901–909, 2016, ISSN: 1528-1159.

Abstract

STUDY DESIGN: A retrospective subgroup analysis was performed on surgically treated patients from the lumbar spinal stenosis (SpS) arm of the Spine Patient Outcomes Research Trial (SPORT), randomized, and observational cohorts.

OBJECTIVE: To identify risk factors for reoperation in patients treated surgically for SpS and compare outcomes between patients who underwent reoperation with those who did not.

SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA: SpS is one of the most common indications for surgery in the elderly; however, few long-term studies have identified risk factors for reoperation.

METHODS: A post-hoc subgroup analysis was performed on patients from the SpS arm of the SPORT, randomized and observational cohorts. Baseline characteristics were analyzed between reoperation and no-reoperation groups using univariate and multivariate analysis on data 8 years postoperation.

RESULTS: Of the 417 study patients, 88% underwent decompression only, 5% noninstrumented fusion, and 6% instrumented fusion. At the 8-year follow-up, the reoperation rate was 18%; 52% of reoperations were for recurrent stenosis or progressive spondylolisthesis, 25% for complication or other reason, and 16% for new condition. Of patients who underwent a reoperation, 42% did so within 2 years, 70% within 4 years, and 84% within 6 years. Patients who underwent reoperation were less likely to have presented with any neurological deficit (43% reop vs. 57% no reop, P = 0.04). Patients improved less at follow-up in the reoperation group (P < 0.001).

CONCLUSION: In patients undergoing surgical treatment for SpS, the reoperation rate at 8-year follow-up was 18%. Patients with a reoperation were less likely to have a baseline neurological deficit. Patients who did not undergo reoperation had better patient reported outcomes at 8-year follow-up compared with those who had repeat surgery.

LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: 2.

BibTeX (Download)

@article{pmid26656062,
title = {Risk Factors for Reoperation in Patients Treated Surgically for Lumbar Stenosis: A Subanalysis of the 8-year Data From the SPORT Trial},
author = {Michael C Gerling and Dante Leven and Peter G Passias and Virginie Lafage and Kristina Bianco and Alexandra Lee and Jon D Lurie and Tor D Tosteson and Wenyan Zhao and Kevin F Spratt and Kristen Radcliff and Thomas J Errico},
doi = {10.1097/BRS.0000000000001361},
issn = {1528-1159},
year  = {2016},
date = {2016-05-01},
urldate = {2016-05-01},
journal = {Spine (Phila Pa 1976)},
volume = {41},
number = {10},
pages = {901--909},
abstract = {STUDY DESIGN: A retrospective subgroup analysis was performed on surgically treated patients from the lumbar spinal stenosis (SpS) arm of the Spine Patient Outcomes Research Trial (SPORT), randomized, and observational cohorts.

OBJECTIVE: To identify risk factors for reoperation in patients treated surgically for SpS and compare outcomes between patients who underwent reoperation with those who did not.

SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA: SpS is one of the most common indications for surgery in the elderly; however, few long-term studies have identified risk factors for reoperation.

METHODS: A post-hoc subgroup analysis was performed on patients from the SpS arm of the SPORT, randomized and observational cohorts. Baseline characteristics were analyzed between reoperation and no-reoperation groups using univariate and multivariate analysis on data 8 years postoperation.

RESULTS: Of the 417 study patients, 88% underwent decompression only, 5% noninstrumented fusion, and 6% instrumented fusion. At the 8-year follow-up, the reoperation rate was 18%; 52% of reoperations were for recurrent stenosis or progressive spondylolisthesis, 25% for complication or other reason, and 16% for new condition. Of patients who underwent a reoperation, 42% did so within 2 years, 70% within 4 years, and 84% within 6 years. Patients who underwent reoperation were less likely to have presented with any neurological deficit (43% reop vs. 57% no reop, P = 0.04). Patients improved less at follow-up in the reoperation group (P < 0.001).

CONCLUSION: In patients undergoing surgical treatment for SpS, the reoperation rate at 8-year follow-up was 18%. Patients with a reoperation were less likely to have a baseline neurological deficit. Patients who did not undergo reoperation had better patient reported outcomes at 8-year follow-up compared with those who had repeat surgery.

LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: 2.},
keywords = {},
pubstate = {published},
tppubtype = {article}
}
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