Cervical disc replacement surgery: indications, technique, and technical pearls - Spinal DISC Center | Kris Radcliff, MD | New Jersey
Dr. Kris Radcliff specializes in simplifying the management of complex spine conditions and traumatic spine injuries, focusing exclusively on spine surgery, with particular expertise in the area of artificial disc replacement. Dr. Radcliff is highly experienced, having performed more than 10,000 spine surgeries. He combines conservative decision-making judgment with state-of-the-art and minimally invasive surgical techniques, endoscopic spine surgery, and artificial disc replacement.
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Cervical disc replacement surgery: indications, technique, and technical pearls

Dante Leven, Joshua Meaike, Kris Radcliff, Sheeraz Qureshi: Cervical disc replacement surgery: indications, technique, and technical pearls. In: Curr Rev Musculoskelet Med, vol. 10, no. 2, pp. 160–169, 2017, ISSN: 1935-973X.

Abstract

PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Cervical disc replacement (CDR) is a surgical option for appropriately indicated patients, and high success rates have been reported in the literature. Complications and failures are often associated with patient indications or technical variables, and the goal of this review is to assist surgeons in understanding these factors.

RECENT FINDINGS: Several investigations have been published in the last 5 years supporting the use of CDR in specific patient populations. CDR has been shown to be comparable or favorable to anterior cervical discectomy and fusion in several meta-analyses and mid-term follow-up studies. CDR was developed as a technique to preserve motion following a decompression procedure while minimizing several of the complications associated with fusion and posterior cervical spine procedures. Though success with cervical fusion and posterior foraminotomy has been well documented in the literature, high rates of mid- and long-term complications have been clearly established. CDR has also been associated with several complications and challenges with regard to surgical technique, though improvements in implant design have lead to an increase in utilization. Several devices currently exist and vary in terms of material, design, and outcomes. This review paper discusses indications, surgical technique, and technical pearls and reviews the CDR devices currently available.

BibTeX (Download)

@article{pmid28493215,
title = {Cervical disc replacement surgery: indications, technique, and technical pearls},
author = {Dante Leven and Joshua Meaike and Kris Radcliff and Sheeraz Qureshi},
doi = {10.1007/s12178-017-9398-3},
issn = {1935-973X},
year  = {2017},
date = {2017-06-01},
urldate = {2017-06-01},
journal = {Curr Rev Musculoskelet Med},
volume = {10},
number = {2},
pages = {160--169},
abstract = {PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Cervical disc replacement (CDR) is a surgical option for appropriately indicated patients, and high success rates have been reported in the literature. Complications and failures are often associated with patient indications or technical variables, and the goal of this review is to assist surgeons in understanding these factors.

RECENT FINDINGS: Several investigations have been published in the last 5 years supporting the use of CDR in specific patient populations. CDR has been shown to be comparable or favorable to anterior cervical discectomy and fusion in several meta-analyses and mid-term follow-up studies. CDR was developed as a technique to preserve motion following a decompression procedure while minimizing several of the complications associated with fusion and posterior cervical spine procedures. Though success with cervical fusion and posterior foraminotomy has been well documented in the literature, high rates of mid- and long-term complications have been clearly established. CDR has also been associated with several complications and challenges with regard to surgical technique, though improvements in implant design have lead to an increase in utilization. Several devices currently exist and vary in terms of material, design, and outcomes. This review paper discusses indications, surgical technique, and technical pearls and reviews the CDR devices currently available.},
keywords = {},
pubstate = {published},
tppubtype = {article}
}
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